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the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condo lenses to senator inouye's -- condoences to senator inouye's family, colleagues, and constituents. in l
the privilege and honor to help in his campaign and i have been in san diego with bob, the love and the affection that his constituents have for congressman filner is just really unparalleled. i want to congratulate him for his magnificent win. it was a tough campaign, but he did an unbelievable job and that's because people in his district really knew him and he had provided the level of services that allowed him to be elected now as -- we will call him very soon, mayor filner. joe baca, congressman baca, has been a voice for the poor and underserved during his entire career, not only here in congress but in the california legislature. i was privileged to work with joe on many, many issues, and he has been a consistent voice, both in the california legislature and now here in congress, for protecting low-income families from unfair predatory and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nut
: that is a larger issue of taxes and spending cuts. caller: thank you. host: bob on the independent line from florida. caller: nobody should worry about the fiscal cliff. asey have everybody's ira's hostage. ira will have to buy ies.sur they are not worried about the budget. everybody that has an ira basically it will have nothing because interest rates will go up so high on the treasury bills in the coming decade. be heldy's ira will hostage. i took money and i put it into gold. i did not pay any taxes on it. possession is 9/10 of the law. let them come and find it. every politician should not take a paycheck. they do not deserve it. they have been bringing our country down. host: in look at what happened 1st.ing jan. uary host: that will happen in january 1 if congress fails to reach a compromise, even a short-term compromise. dan on the phone from massachusetts. caller: thank you for taking my call. i would like to know how many millionaires there are in this country versus the number of people who make $250,000 and less. i think that's where the argument can bw won e won. john boehner is
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
on the state department during a time of fiscal austerity. host: here is a follow-up from senator bob corker who will take over as the ranking republican in the senate foreign relations committee in the 113th congress. [video clip] >> you were fully aware and either you send people there with a security or you send them there. i don't understand why you did not send a notification out, but the cables coming in, with concerns about security, why didn't you do just what you did with this -- seeking additional funds? i did not understand. the appropriations committee has never received from the state department a notification asking to shift funds for security in benghazi. i just want you to tell me why that didn't happen. you do it all the time. it happens almost weekly. >> senator, as you know, we are constantly evaluating our security posture. we are constantly reevaluating where we need funds. and we are constantly by winning the current situation on the ground in all of our countries. as you are well aware, we have risks all over the world and we are constantly evaluating and determining -
policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour half.fa i would direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and like all your thoughts, they need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to live, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those, and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, following up on this morning's session, in order that a balanced approach, w
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
for small businesses. host: bob. minnesota. independent caller. caller: by an independent. i'm retired, and i am quite old, old enough to see that -- everyone that i know with -- i know has been involved in business. sometimes you are a worker, sometimes a private contractor. anybody that earns money is a business. we hire phone companies, garbage collectors, we have roads repaired. we are all business people. i am not sure why we think certain businesses are more privileged and deserve special favor from washington. -been retired long enough. every year i worked extra jobs and christmas, and in 1998 i worked at a big box store and they paid me $13 an hour. in 2007, they paid me $8 an hour. host: from twitter, how to determine which business leaders to speak to the administration? guest: we will answer bob put the question first. you make the point that a lot of people are in business one way or the other. there is a larger trend in smaller businesses, and people starting businesses from their own home. about 5000 new businesses are generated each year. we've seen through the recession
blumenthal and chris murphy. at 4:00, "face the nation." bob schieffer talks with governor molloy and paul vance. chuck schumer of new york and kay bailey, from texas. these are brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. the rearing begins at noon eastern. at 3:00, listened to them all on c-span radio. -- listen to them all on c-span radio. you can listen on your smart phone or online. caller: my inspiration was -- [video clip] >> my inspiration was the archives and documents about the cold war. talking about roosevelt, stalin, churchill, we know the main events from our point of view. i wanted to show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? how did they behave? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonigh
, i had the privilege of being with him. we stopped with bob dole as well. they were on a mountain top, literally as the crow flies, i think it was only two miles on the same day, both mortally wounded in fighting for their country. just above the bridges above custody. because of danny's sense of honor, that is the only thin i can ascribe it to. his loyalty first and foremost to his platoon, to the men he had sworn he would protect. he would do everything in his power to protect them. this is a man who kept fighting on that ridge even after his arm was severed. crying a grenade out of his severed arm and charging the next machine gun nest, taking it out in the process saving his men. he was awarded the medal of honor for incredible bravery. he did not do it because he was brave. he did it because he was loyal. he did it because of a sense of duty. he did it because this was his country. robert could have been talking about danny when he said -- when will the fis fear, when duty throws the gauntlet down to fete, when honor scorns to compromise with the death, that is heroism. in every
that as well as the american people. a lot can happen. just as bob said it -- i said in my remarks that the tax issue could get resolved this weekend or it could get resolved at the beginning of next year. it will get resolved. almost all americans will not pay higher taxes next year. but it could happen this weekend. >> the meeting ends today, if there is a proposal put on the table, we're hearing about smaller-scale proposals to get enough republican support in the senate, and not just get 60 votes. do you need an estate tax -- is it ok if it's just different income and unemployment? >> it would be best to let senator mcconnell and others meet with the president today and have them talk about that in private. probably the meeting that happens today is more for optics and probably the substance occurs after that when staff begins to talk. they ought to work on that together, and i think it is best for me not to comment on what should or should not be in it. i want to come back to this -- the 112th congress has scored, litigated, debated every one of the issues that lamar and i are talking abou
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
'neill did, the way clinton did with bob dole, and newt gingrich. there is a long history of this. it means people getting into a room and preventing what we all want to prevent, and if we share the same goal, there should be a way for us to reach it. i am sorry that the house yesterday was unable to pass that the resolution, which was obviously a rebuke to their leader, but hopefully over their recess, when the come back after christmas, there will be cooler heads prevail in, and the president will begin serious negotiations. thanks. >> coming up on c-span, the national rifle association ceo. following that, senators feinstein and blumenthal. after that, secretary arnie duncan talks about safety in schools. tomorrow on "washington journal" we look at the so- called disco cliff and other -- fiscal cliff. our guest is stephen dinan. then a look at the colombo and shootings and the recent tragedy in the newtown shootings. washington journal is live here on c-span. >> if you work for him, you sometimes get a generous or overbearing or cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his a
in herndon is here to talk to us about the consequences for small businesses. bob. [applause] hello -- >> hello. i own an embroidery franchise out in herndon, va., and we work for small businesses, schools, corporations. i'm happy to be here today to talk to you about the fiscal cliff and how it might affect my business. i am mostly optimistic about our economy in the future, i have grave concerns about what is going on in congress and the potential fiscal cliff we are facing and the elimination of the tax cuts. a lot of the small business owners i talked to and know are in favor of keeping the tax cuts in place especially for the middle class. we believe in balanced approach and we think it's ok to allow the elimination of the tax cuts for the wealthy. as taxes increase, the taxes at my business will be effected and i will have less to pay for investments and new equipment, hiring new people, but personally my income tax rates will go up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for
. host: from twitter -- bob is next on this issue. caller: good morning. i only want to say that although i am against the gay lifestyle and i do not believe a danger of their marriage, i think our government should stick to the constitution. the state courts have nothing to say about it. we say no gay marriage, period. we should not go around and heard them. it is unnatural for a man to be with a man. i think we should have won solid law against it. host: why keep it at a government level and not at the state level? caller: look at what is going on now. we set a lot. everybody says, i interpret it this way or that way. it is causing more and more problems. we do that all of the time. man, woman, period. host: "the washington post" adds -- good morning from minnesota on the democrats' line. caller: thank you for c-span. this is what i have not heard said by both -- most of the things i have listened to or watched between the debates on gay marriage. it is all legal documents. some states have the take a blood test. you have to get a marriage license from your state or county. when you get
. that's the furthest thing from the truth. host: bob in silver spring, maryland, republican. caller: how are ya? i don't like it when the democrats all ask for gun restrictions in view of the tragedy. what about restrictions on the first amendment? do you want a balanced approach? should we restrict violent movies and video games by law? maybe in a movie, only three people can get shot, what do you think of that? guest: i am a former journalist. i have great respect for the first amendment and of the right to expression. we want to promote creativity and promote restrictit, so i would not advocate any legislative controls on content. -- we want to promote creativity, not to restrict it. we are talking about the need for parents to be responsible in what they allow their impressionable children to use or to seek. beyond that, i don't see we have much of our role. host: our last call comes from lamont in mansfield, ohio, a democrat. caller: how are you doing? i have more of a comment than a question. i think the problem with the guns does not act to do with legislation or mental check ups.
not fight or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. like the panama canal treaty. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they worked well together. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it hhe gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling tamendments out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyone is going crazy
. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a
insurance of the up there? host: thank you for the call. is this from bill king. this is bob, good morning. caller: happy new year. host: to you, too. caller: all the republican party has to do is to allow for what the voters voted on by putting obama back in office, which was the mandate that people earning above $250,000 pay 4.5%.eer lousy that is not a hair off their chinny-chin-chin. everybody is looking to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of mon
that will be up on the hill headed by bob adams. several others will be joining. thank you so much for joining us today. if you have any questions, please stick around and ask. thank you very much. >> thank you so much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> up next on c-span, today's house debate on the fiscal cliff. then, chris van hollen. >> the senate's all -- the senate small business committee holds a hearing on the hurricanes and the response -- hurricane sandy response. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3 and c- span.org. >> i wanted to explain how totalitarianism happens. we have seen the documents of cold war. roosevelt, stalin, churchill, truman. we know the main events from our point of view. -- point of view. what i wanted to do a show from a different angle, from the ground up. what did it feel like to be the people who were subjected to the system? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has been very differentiated. these countries longer have much in common with each other -- no longer have much in common with each other. . -- sunda
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